The Construction Leadership Council (CLC) published its ‘Roadmap to Recovery’ strategy on 1 June. The idea is to drive recovery in the sector and to help the wider UK economy. 
 
As we move on from the coronavirus outbreak and the economic downturn that is expected to follow it, construction will have an important role to play. 
 
Construction employs over 3million people in a wide range of professions and trades, including electrical installation and maintenance. It also exports valuable products and services. 
We are all spending a lot more time in our homes. Here are some simple things you can do to minimise risks of electrical shocks, fires, and accidents. 
 
Electrical risks at home 
If you have unprotected contact with electricity it can cause a shock and burns, which could be fatal. 
 
Household electrical accidents, including electrocutions and electrical fires, cause around 70 deaths and 350,000 injuries each year in the UK, according to the Electrical Safety Council (ESC). Almost half of accidental house fires in Britain are caused by electricity. 
Mother and children with tablet computer
Underfloor heating is one of the fastest growing sectors of the UK’s heating industry. 
 
It accounted for around 7.7% by value in 2019, according to a recent report which makes forecasts for the sector to 2024. It is expected to continue growing annually at 4 to 6% for the next four years. 
From next month British Gas will provide 100% renewable electricity and Corona will provide natural gas to NHS properties across England. 
 
NHS Property Services (NHSPS) is responsible for around 11% of the NHS estate. That’s over 3,500 properties amounting to more than 34million square feet; home to around 5,000 employees. 
Leaders in testing, inspection and certification, Bureau Veritas, have highlighted safety risks in the UK’s schools. 
 
All of the country’s education institutions are being urged to take a more rigorous approach to safety and compliance. 
The new Electrotechnical Assessment Specification (EAS) was released last month. It’s intended to be used by bodies that certify and register anyone carrying out electrical installation and inspections. It is part of work to improve electrical safety and competence to meet the requirements of the Building Regulations. It will come into effect in September 2020, but it can be used voluntarily from now on. 
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